Thursday, January 10, 2013

A Writing Boost

The children in our class have been actively engaged and loving this new, simple writing lesson.    Inspired by the Handwriting Without Tears method of 'Wet, Dry, Try,' I put together the following small tray:

'Wet, Dry, Try' writing tray to be used with the chalkboards.
Small dish for water; sponge; two pieces of chalk (one for the teacher, one for the child receiving the lesson).
This lesson is typically done with a teacher because the first part requires the teacher to demonstrate the formation of a letter, word, or number:

First, the teacher writes the letter ('t') with a piece of chalk. 
Next, the child dips her finger into the small dish with water and proceeds to trace the same letter produced by the teacher.  
Then, the child retrieves the sponge to 'dry' the letter by tracing over using the same motion.
Lastly, the child 'tries' the letter on her own with the chalk.  
This photo, showing a separate lesson, demonstrates the same process only practicing writing words rather than letters.
This lesson has a 'rock star' effect - not only have groups of onlookers been mesmerized by the process, but the student completing the lesson is filled with great satisfaction and sense of pride.   That tiny tray (holding the 'wet, dry, try' materials) surely carries BIG impact!!!

7 comments:

  1. great idea!

    oppidum

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  2. Read this post before I headed off to my school, love it! I am setting it up ASAP!

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  3. Great - you and the kids will love it! :)

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  4. What ages are your students?

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    1. My students range in age from three to six years old.

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  5. I absolutely adore your blog, such good ideas and so much inspiration. Very recognizable as well, I have been working on the general classroom atmosphere more than on individual lessons, as a teacher we just 'go with the flow'. Thanks for your time and for sharing!

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    1. Thanks so much, Sonja. It's good to know others are doing the same with working on classroom atmosphere vs. individual lessons...

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